• @[email protected]
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    6 months ago

    To anyone who reads this: I know everyone talks about Linux around Lemmy, and that you’ve already been offered to install Linux a million times.

    I understand how much it puts you off.

    But this time, give a try. For real. Try it, there’s nothing to lose.

    The reason we don’t ever shut up about it is because Linux is just so much better that many of us don’t imagine how we lived without it. Unironically.

    Spend a week on Linux. Install Mint, or Manjaro, and run them - not in VM, use dualboot. You can easily delete Linux afterwards if you don’t like it, straight out of Windows. Run it for a week.

    And you’ll be like us.

      • Cethin
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        46 months ago

        For word there’s a web client if you need to have word, but there’s also FOSS alternatives that aren’t word that work just as well.

        For Adobe, I’m not sure. Do you need Adobe, or can an alternative work?

        Microsoft obviously often only supports Windows, though they do have a decent amount of Linux support too, because their developers use Linux frequently. A lot of other large companies don’t support Linux either because they don’t see the incentive, or they have another worse reason, such as helping Microsoft maintain market dominance.

        • @[email protected]
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          56 months ago

          Yeah I have to have Adobe for legal documents, and Word, too. Some mfs even still use Word Perfect.

          • @[email protected]
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            66 months ago

            No other PDF reader/word processor is able to do the same?

            There are plenty of both with pretty much exact same functionality.

            But if you really depend on those for some obscure reason, Wine should help.

          • @[email protected]
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            6 months ago

            Honesty if you have to have Microsoft and adobe stuff get a Mac.

            Sure the hardware sucks, but at least you’re getting a Unix based OS that while is inferior to Linux is a lot more stable then Windows and everyone knows adobe software runs better on Macs due to most of the industry using them.

            Honesty it’s a shame MacOS is tied to Apple hardware( yes I know about hackintoshes, but that’s a messy unofficial work around )

            As someone who has daily driven all 3 for at least a couple years my OS ranking is:

            1. Linux
            2. MacOS
            3. Windows

            But if you can live without proprietary software use Linux.

            Also out of interest what got you on Lemmy if you’re not into FOSS and Linux? Just wondering why other people join.

      • @[email protected]
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        26 months ago

        Practically, no. If a Linux user need Adobe for her life, then she needs to use it from a Virtual Machine.

    • @[email protected]
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      36 months ago

      The problem comes when you talk about gaming.

      You can talk about proton and such all you want.

      At the end of the day can I come home from work install some new game I want to play and probably have it just work, without feature compromises…

      One day maybe, but not yet.

      • @[email protected]
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        56 months ago

        Kinda my gaming experience on Linux right now.

        For most games, I install them and they just run perfectly fine.

        There are a few games that still need tweaks, though, that is true.

        • @[email protected]
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          16 months ago

          It’s more stuff like, does ray tracing and stuff like nvidia broadcast work?

          Like I use that to filter all my incoming sound from discord and all the audio coming into my microphone.

          It’s the oddball features like that example above where Linux always falls over for me.

          Don’t get me wrong I HATE windows.

          I really really hope that steam os on the steam deck is going to maybe push devs to make more native Linux releases.

          • @[email protected]
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            26 months ago

            I see; I don’t personally use those tools, so can’t tell you anything about it.

            Hope they’ll be included soon, one way or the other, if they aren’t!

            Thanks for your feedback.

          • @[email protected]
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            16 months ago

            Ray tracing works, but Nvidia broadcast itself doesn’t work. There are other projects out there like NoiseTorch that do a really good job at filtering audio.

    • @[email protected]
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      16 months ago

      The second sentence of the last paragraph. That’s what turns me off of switching. I have absolutely no clue what any of that means. Not all of us are tech savvy and Linux seems to be aimed at those who are. The jargon alone is enough to be maddening to the average person.

      • @[email protected]
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        6 months ago

        I see

        While we may sometimes use such terms since Lemmy is populated mostly by tech-savvy people, it’s absolutely not required for you to be one to successfully install and operate Linux!

        I’ll tell you what to do.

        But first, a quick explainer on the terms, so you could get savvier too. It is in no way super required for you to be on Linux, but you’ll be able to understand talks made here way easier:

        1.Mint and Manjaro are so-called distributions of Linux. Unlike Windows, which is a full complete system, Linux is modular and is based on the Linux kernel - basically a core of an operating system doing the most important and complicated things. And then on top of that there is a lot of other code that makes slight changes on how it all works called the distribution. Don’t worry - all Linux distribution are good and compatible with each other, so your pick is mostly one of personal liking.

        2.VM - virtual machine. Basically software that allows you to launch operating system within an operating system. With virtual machines, you can launch Linux out of Windows, Windows out of Linux, and any other combination with pretty much any operating system you can imagine. VMs are good for checking something out or when you really really need something in another operating system (very advanced stuff). In fact, you can try out Linux using a VM - just load an image (more on that below) into program like VirtualBox and you’re all set. Still, VMs are limiting, and for a much better experience I recommend you to go for a Linux install (more on that below).

        3.Dualboot - a type of operating system install that lets you choose which operating system to go to when you turn your computer on. For example, I’m on Linux full-time, but if for some reason I’ll need to turn on my PC and go to Windows, I can. And so could you.

        Now, install!

        This part is super easy.

        First, you need a USB flash drive (8+GB) and a flashing software like Balena Etcher. Download and install it.

        Then, you need to choose system image - basically, what you’ll put on your USB stick and what will end up on your computer. Images for Linux Mint are here. They only differ in looks and performance, but if your computer runs modern Windows, you can take anything you like. Cinnamon is the most common. Images for Manjaro are here - if prompted to choose architecture, take x86_64. Choice of image is - again - matter of looks, just don’t go i3 or Sway, those are advanced. I recommend going with the most default option - Plasma Desktop, i.e. KDE. Pick just one - either Mint or Manjaro, whatever you’d like, both are excellent choices. Unsure? Mint is most common recommendation, but looks a little Windows 7-ey. Manjaro with Plasma is super sexy and incredibly snappy, but it’d benefit from you learning more basics about Linux. Still, very good as it is.

        Then, put your drive in, open Balena Etcher, pick image, pick your USB, flash. After success, reboot your PC and load into flash drive (you might want to press F8 or other button depending on motherboard when computer turns on again so that it doesn’t just load into Windows instead). Boom! You’re in a live version of Linux. It is very limited, it runs off your flash drive, but you’ll already get to see how it looks. Now desktop will have an icon saying “Install …”, press it and install the system. The installation program is super intuitive and tells you everything you need to know. The only dangerous part is partitioning - you should make sure installation program detected Windows and will not overwrite it (assuming you still need it) - it’ll remind you of that, don’t worry. Ideally, you should install Linux on another physical drive (you’ll be able to choose it), but that’s not strictly required. Then you wait and…

        …BOOM! Now every time you turn your PC on, you can choose whether to use Linux or Windows. If anything is not clear, there’s a million of very friendly guides on every aspect of what I just said, including the scariest parts. Go ahead, try it out! You won’t regret.

      • @[email protected]
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        06 months ago

        Googling isn’t hard these days. Take 15 seconds to find out what those mean and you’ll understand it’s not difficult.

    • @trackindakraken
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      6 months ago

      I’m trying Ubuntu now. I’ve had it installed for about three months. I only switch to Windows 10 to play Starfield. The only problem I’ve had… (delete, it’s a long story I don’t want to write). I had to reinstall, I couldn’t figure out how to reinstall and keep my settings and apps, so I had to redo everything. I’m glad I still had Windows (because I wanted to play Starfield), because I would have been screwed–I had formatted the USB stick I used to install Ubuntu the first time. It’s been probably over 10 years since I needed to use a recovery disc to get Windows running again.

      It’s unfortunate that AAA game developers won’t support Linux. But, the money isn’t there, and we live under capitalism. Without reliable, plug-n-play, easy-as-Windows game support, Linux will remain niche. I’m sure the point has been made before, but here it is again, and still.

      • @[email protected]
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        16 months ago

        But, the money isn’t there

        There are no users on Linux because there are no games!

        They don’t make games for Linux because there are no users!

        Except Valve nullified all those arguments. First with Proton, and then with the Steam Deck.

        Companies don’t even have to target Linux with dedicated builds anymore. They just need to target Proton, which reduces the work for a Linux version by at least 90%.

      • @[email protected]
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        16 months ago

        People who are hostile towards other people trying to be genuinely helpful are baffling to me. You could have scrolled past and gone on with your day.